Showing posts with label New Year's Resolutions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label New Year's Resolutions. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

My Mother's Diary (and a Meaningful New Year's Resolution for You to Consider)

When my sister and I were clearing out my mother's house after her death in 1999 at the age of 91, I came across my mother's diary and brought it back home with me, and though I dabbled in reading it back then, it's only been lately that I decided to actually read it all.






Mark Twain said:

"When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years."

When we are young, we don't seem to give much thought to what is going on with our parents, who they are or whether or not they are happy.  We tend to take them for granted. Perhaps that is why we end up knowing so little about our parents. 

I actually don't think I gave my mother any credit for "learning" anything until I was in my 50's.  Oh, yes, I tried to talk to her from time to time and find out how she felt about things, but we were not only from very different generations but we were on a different wave length.

You see my mother was born in 1908 and she was 40 when I was born.  That puts me at 21 in 1969, at the height of the Vietnam War and the sexual, social and political revolution that was taking place around the world.  My mother had absolutely no idea what was going on with me and pretty much wanted me to stay her sweet little 1950's goody-two-shoes.  That wasn't going to happen.

But it wasn't all my fault.  I remember when I was in middle school, sitting on the edge of my parents' bed with my Dad and asking him why I didn't know him as well as my best friend.  Even then I was trying to make a connection between him as a Dad and him as a person. He said something about parents not wanting to worry their children, which looking back now, was an interesting comment.

I read something recently that said our children will never love us as much as we love them, and now that I have had children of my own, I understand that, and it actually gives me some strange comfort.  It's like it's not ME my children have rejected by not hanging on my every word or asking me if I am happy or not; it's the nature of things. Children just don't wonder if their parents are happy.  They are too busy wondering when they are going to be happy.  When we're young we take our parents for granted and don't really give them much thought unless they are getting in our way.  I literally know nothing about what really made my mother tick other than what she didn't like about ME.

Now as I near 70 I would give anything to have her here to ask her questions about her life and marriage.

But I have her diary.

The diary documents my mother's life from 1930 through 1933, age 22 to 25, which was also the time that my mother and dad were "courting (they married when they both were 26).




My mother's entries in her diary consist of mostly pretty mundane stuff.  Each entry was only a few lines per day, but I was able to glean some things I didn't know:

  • When I was growing up, my Dad was a musician and played trumpet in various bands right up until he died.  But I didn't realize how much he did that as a young man.  My mother is always mentioning in her diary that my Dad, Frederic, was playing this evening or that evening but it added up to quite a few evenings per week.  And he was also in college during that time.

  • My mother also talks about her friend, Rosella.  She is the person I am named after, and I didn't know anything about her because by the time I came along, she had moved away. Likewise, it was fun reading about my mother's other friends whom I only knew as old ladies.  I thought it was wonderful that my mother still had all of those friends all of her life.

  • I didn't realize how close my mother was to her own mother.  My mother's mother died when I was around five, so I don't remember her very well, but my mother talks lovingly of her in her diary.  I knew that her mother had gone back to Sweden to visit her family but had not realized it was for three months.  My mother writes in her diary, "Mother has been gone for a week and it seems like a year."  I think that was partly because my mother's older sister was married and no longer lived at home but her five brothers did, so looking after her Dad and her brothers probably fell to her.  I found it interesting that my mother had told me about an unsettling incident that had happened to her during that time her mother was away but no mention of it in her diary.



  • Reading my mother's diary, I was happy to see that my Dad was just as thoughtful a boyfriend as he was a Dad.  He was always writing her letters and giving her gifts and she called him "My darling" and "My Sweetheart" throughout the diary. That made me happy and sad at the same time.  It made me happy because they clearly loved each other when they were courting, but sad because it was clear to me growing up, that by the time I came along, my Mother and Dad were not that happy together.  Though their marriage lasted until my Dad's death - almost 60 years - something had gone wrong somewhere but I never found out what it was.

  • My Mother's diary had all kinds of little keepsakes in it and clippings from the newspaper: announcements about programs at the YWCA or the Women's Club that she was a part of but also pictures of things she liked and things she wanted to remember such as cards and notes.


  • Ironically, though reading someone's diary should be like reading their thoughts, just as she was in life, my mother's diary didn't reveal very much about her inner thoughts.  Her diary is mostly a few lines each day about what she did - she came home and took a nap, her friend came for dinner and she would describe what they ate, she went to a concert, she received a letter from my Dad-to-be or she didn't.  Nothing very revealing and very little about what she actually felt about her life.

And that is not surprising since my mother was never one to talk about her feelings and she didn't deem it an appropriate topic of conversation either.  I remember as a teenager saying to her, "Mom, I am feeling depressed," and her response was "What do you have to be depressed about!"  It wasn't a question.  It was a statement.  She probably added "Count your blessings," and that was the end of that conversation.  Isn't it funny and ironic that I was a teenager who actually wanted to talk to her mother, but, also ironically, unlike most mothers of teenaged girls who wanted their daughters to share with them, I had a mother who didn't want me to.  So that was that.

She was also very practical.  When I was having problems in my marriage, I remember calling my mother and saying, "Mom, he has been cheating on me and is in love with someone else," and she replied, "Well, you can't fight that."  And she was right.  I couldn't.  So that was that.

So my mother's diary very much reflects her reluctance to share feelings and her practicality.  Except for mentioning the occasional spat with her husband-to-be, my Dad, my mother's diary reveals little of her thoughts, no soul-searching, no sad stories, no doubts about herself, so if I was expecting revelations about her life, they are not there.

But I am comforted by the details of her life as a young woman, a young twenty-something who would one day marry her sweetheart, my Dad, and give birth to me. I enjoyed reading about her daily life: she was an active young woman who was the secretary to the president of the local bank; she read books and went to concerts and plays; she was active at the YWCA, and at her church and belonged to a young women's business club; loved her mother and her family and she was always on the go.  She didn't appear to have a bad word to say about anyone. In fact, she spoke lovingly of her nieces (her older sister had already married and had children) and friends. She would mention my Dad's parents or her brothers and sisters but never revealed how she felt about any of them which is odd, because later in life, she had plenty to say!  But in her twenties, she seemed happy and hopeful, with her whole life ahead of her.

I am glad I have my mother's diary and can spend some time with her as the young woman she was.  I just wish I had spent more time with her older self, when she was still alive, so that I could have found out more about her.  I wish I had let her little criticisms of me go over my head and not cloud our relationship.  I let those criticisms bother me and because I was busy living my life far away and raising my own children, I didn't make the effort to visit her much or talk with her on the phone more than once a week. 

But I loved my mother and I know she loved me.  When I finally did get a divorce and asked her to come and help me, at 74, she dropped everything and traveled by herself to California from Michigan to help me with my two-year-old son and to help me get back on my feet, and it was comforting to know she was always there for me - and she was.



Now that I have grown children too, and am in a position similar to my mother's, I have time to reflect and feel regret that I never had talks with her about her true feelings (though I can remember trying upon occasion), what drove her to do some of the things she did, how she felt about her 50+ year marriage at the end and if she had any regrets in life.  Though I am glad to have her diary and glad that she did share some important things with me over the years, I still have so many questions.  I wish my mother was still here to answer them.

But now it's too late.

Since my parents are both dead, it's too late for me to ask them questions that I have, but it's not too late for those of you whose parents are still alive.  I urge you to try to find out about them.  I'm not talking about their accomplishments or the family tree, I am talking about finding out why they raised you the way they did, why they married who they married, how they feel about getting old, what they have learned about life, what they regret.  All of those things that make them who they are.  You will learn about them but it also might shed some light on who you are too.

So here's an idea for a meaningful New Year's Resolution.

Make a resolution that in 2018 you will have some meaningful conversations with each of your parents to find out about who they really are and how they feel about their lives.

It's too late for me but it's not too late for you.

Don't wait.  Do it now. 

Do it before all you have left is a diary.


Thanks for reading!



See you Friday 

for

"The Best and the Worst Movies of 2017:
 
Rosy the Reviewer's Top 10" 

 
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Tuesday, January 5, 2016

My New Year's Resolutions: It's the Little Things

[UPDATE:  I wrote this at the beginning of 2016 and reading this again at the end of 2016, I realize the futility of making New Year's resolutions so I am not going to do it anymore!]


Well, here it is again.  That thing every year that I dread.

New Year's Resolutions - a list of things I need to change, improve, stop doing or start doing, usually things I don't want to change, improve, stop doing or start doing.  Common New Year's Resolutions are to lose weight, stop smoking, stop drinking, be nicer, exercise, get a better job, stop moaning, well, you know the drill.

There was only one year that I can remember that I didn't feel the need to make the usual New Year's Resolution to lose weight.  That was the year I had lost 50 pounds and was down to a weight I liked, though still pounds over what I was when I met Hubby.  But since I have gained back half of that over the last five years or so, "losing weight" is back on the list.

I have my 50th High School Reunion coming up this year and, though I have never been to a high school or college reunion, this year I am going to do it. I have found several of my classmates on Facebook and interact with them on almost a daily basis, so I would love to see them again in person.



I know something like a high school reunion is usually a catalyst for people to lose weight or make some other changes.  Having something to work toward is often a motivator.  For example, my daughter and her husband have taken up running and to motivate themselves, she plans to run a half marathon and he plans to run a marathon, so they see their runs as training for those upcoming events.  Likewise, you would think my high school reunion would be the same kind of motivator for me.  I want to surprise my old classmates with how great I would look, right?  But you know what?  For me, thinking of having to get myself in shape for the reunion and what my classmates might think of me if I don't has the opposite effect.  It stresses me out so much that I head straight for the salted caramel ice cream!

Last year I tried to get around this whole resolutions thing by having an "Un-Resolutions" list, not a list of what I was going to change or do, but a list of things that I was NOT going to do in 2015.  As I review that list (which I probably immediately forgot as soon as 2015 rolled around, which is fairly typical.  Guess how long people keep working on their New Year's Resolutions?  I think by February most people are saying, "New Year's Resolutions?  What are those?"), I can see some advantages to these types of resolutions.

Anyway, let me recap some of last year's "un-resolutions."

--Don't gain any more weight.
Did that.  I'm still fat but I didn't get any fatter.

--Don't add any more bad habits to my life
Mmm, does upping my daily Starbucks nonfat sugar free vanilla latte from a tall to a grande count? Or cutting my toe nails with scissors?

---I am not going to enable my wine-guzzling poodle anymore
Oops.  I can't say that I have not given him a sip or two over the last year, but after an unfortunate incident where he fell off the bed, I have definitely cut his intake down.

 


---Not buying clothes I don't try on
I completely forgot about that one

---I vowed to NOT stop watching TV.
You're damn right!  Can't miss the last season of "Downton Abbey," the next dose of "Game of Thrones," my daily dose of "The View (I think of them as my dysfunctional friends)" or "Marriage Boot Camp: Reality Stars!" *

The rest consisted of my not stopping my quest to get Oprah's attention, not ordering Hubby around, not bitching about the state of the world and not beating myself up if I couldn't live up to my un-resolutions, all of which were met with varying success over the last year.

So if you are someone whose resolve to change flies out the window some time between January 15 and February 1, I recommend that "un-resolution" approach.

However, since I already did that, I thought I would go back to the traditional list, though instead of giving myself a very tall order as Hubby has done -- his resolution every year is "to be a better person" to which I always reply, "Good luck with that," I would concentrate on some little things.

 



All of the experts say that if you set resolutions that are unquantifiable, all-encompassing and vague, you might as well not make them at all.  In Hubby's case, his quest "to be a better person" includes losing weight, drinking less, working out more, making more money and probably finding the fountain of youth.  Ain't gonna happen.

I, on the other hand, the wiser and more practical one, if I do say so myself, have decided that this year I am going to give myself some small, more attainable goals to achieve.

Yes, losing weight will always be on the table but that's not something I need to resolve every year.  It's something I need to resolve every DAY!


So here are
 
"My Little New Year's Resolutions for 2016."



1.  Walk Tarquin every day (that it's not pouring down rain).

I live in a lovely wooded area and people are out walking their dogs all of the time, and I like to walk.  However, I have discovered that despite the lovely scenery and my desire to walk off my big butt (which I will continue to do as my Fitbit dictates that I walk 10,000 steps per day - I talked about that journey in my blog post "Fitbit on my Shoulder"), I am not a dog-walking person. 

I am not sure what it is...perhaps it's Tarquin's desire to pee on everything that stands upright or his pulling on the leash or that inevitable poop that I will have to clean up and carry around for the entire walk (why does it always happen at the beginning of the walk?  Why can't he wait to do that when we are closer to home)?

The only problem with this resolution is what to do about Freddy.  Hubby walks Mildred, the collie, because she is a friendly, good walker.  Freddy is getting on in years and seems to hate everyone and everything.  He pulls on the leash, barks and growls at other dogs and generally makes the whole experience unpleasant.  But I get it.  It's no fun getting old.


(Freddy is the one in the Seahawks shirt - another story entirely)




2.  Meditate every day

I was really good about this for a long time and touted its benefits in a blog post a couple of years ago.  I felt myself becoming very zen, liking my fellow men and women, and feeling, well, happy.  But then life started getting in the way and I would never seem to have the time.  Unfortunately, Hubby can really tell the difference when I don't meditate. If I am crabby or start yelling or bitching or having a rant, he says, "Did you meditate today?"  Of course, if he asks me that I yell, bitch or rant even more. 



3.  Cook real food and less of it
I love to cook and for some reason I have a thing about casseroles. But the problem with casseroles is that they are usually meant for a crowd.  Now that it's just the two of us, if I make a casserole it sticks around in the fridge for a week or more as we work on it.  That wouldn't be such a problem, but I really like to try different recipes, so sometimes it can be two or three casseroles and that's when I hear Hubby say, "Cripes. What are we going to do with all of this food?"  Hubby is actually the one who came up with the "real food" idea, meaning simple food - a protein, a veg, a starch.  So I am going to work on that, though it's not nearly as much fun as my mother's Tater Tots Casserole or my Ravioli Lasagna for a Crowd.




4.  Go to bed by 11
It is a miracle that Hubby and I have remained married for over 31 years from the standpoint of our personal clocks alone.  Hubby is decidedly a morning person and I am a night owl.  He gets up every morning at 6am and starts work at 7am.  To do that, he needs to get to bed by 11pm and he usually does that.  I mean, sometimes a program on TV won't be over but, even though he has already invested over an hour on it, he will get up and start pulling down the shades. 

"What are you doing?  The Bachelor** hasn't given out the final rose yet." 

To which he will reply, "Gotta go to bed now, it's 11." (Just an FYI, I know what you are thinking.  Hey, "The Bachelor" is over by 10. I know, but we have everything pre-recorded on our TIVO so we often watch a program later than its actual time so we can avoid the ads).  But anyway, Hubby is like Cinderfella.  When the clock strikes 11, he's off to bed no matter what, in case he turns into a pumpkin.

I, on the other hand, could easily stay up until two or three in the morning and sleep until noon.  It's not quite that drastic, but I just can't imagine going to bed before midnight, and now that I am retired, I don't need to get up early anymore, so why not?  But as my mother used to say, "Nothing good happens after midnight."  Of course she was saying that to my teenage self who was always trying to get a later curfew, but she was right.  If I stay up late, I am more likely to have that extra glass of wine or that piece of chocolate cake that shouldn't be in the house anyway, so I am going to try to change my body clock to be more in sync with Hubby --- but no way am I getting up before 9am!




5.  Wear hats
On a trip to Canada recently, I was reminded of the fact that one of the things I don't like about traveling is having to fix my hair everyday (when I don't have to go anywhere or be seen by anyone except Hubby, I usually don't do anything with my hair and look like hell).  I don't have the kind of hair that looks good with a brush and a fluff.  I need to hot roller it every time I want to look decent, so I travel with a little hot roller set of 10 rollers, never enough to set my whole head of hair and it's all just a major pain.  So I thought, mmm - that's what it sounds like when I think -- "If I wear a hat that looks good on me that I can also wear indoors and out, then that solves the old hair problem, right?"

What do you think?




6.  Finally, I have some "projects" that I want to continue to work on.  I may be retired but I don't want to appear brain dead.

Tarot Card reading - I want to be able to do this without consulting the books. I find it fun and meditative and who knows, I might discover a second career as "Madame Rosy, Seer of All Things."

Take some Oprah courses - I have one that I purchased that I haven't gotten to yet.  Who knew I would get into the whole self help thing?  I had an ex-husband who was into all of that and I used to poo-poo it.  That might explain what happened to that marriage!

Read more - I read, but mostly at the gym on the elliptical.  I am one of those gym-goers who wouldn't go if I didn't have a book and ear buds blasting my favorite music.  That works OK but I need to carve out some reading time at home.  Reading used to be my favorite activity, but I don't do it as much as I used to. To sort of quote "The Godfather," "Just when I thought I was out, [it pulls] me back in!"

Continue to find ways to market my blog - I'm still hoping Oprah will discover me.  But until she does, hey, why not make a small New Year's Resolution yourself to share my blog with your friends and family who you think would enjoy it?  You would be making an old retired lady very happy.

So those are just some little things I am going to "resolve" for the New Year.

I am going to stick with the little things.  I can certainly master wearing hats, cooking less and going to bed earlier in the New Year.

I don't think we should use the beginning of a new year as a catalyst for setting ourselves up for failure by setting big goals and expectations that we might fail at. I actually find the end of one year and the start of another rather depressing.  It's a reminder that another year has passed and I didn't live up to my resolutions that I set.  Also as I get older, it's a sign that yet another year has passed...period.  I wonder, how many are left?

I am not saying to not have New Year's Resolutions if that motivates you to make some needed changes.  But instead of setting goals to make ourselves look better or even be better, I think the end of the year should be a time of real reflection on a larger scale.

Instead of making New Year's Resolutions to lose weight, exercise more or stop spending so much money, maybe at the end of each year we should be asking ourselves...

  • Am I happy?
  • Am I with the right person?
  • Do I have a good relationship with my children?
  • Am I doing with my life what I should be doing with it?
  • Am I showing love to those I love?
  • Am I reaching out to those who need my help?
  • Do I take good care of myself?
  • Do I deserve a wonderful 2016?
  • Am I grateful for what I have?  Family, love, health, (fill in the blank ___)?



If the answer to any of those questions is "No," then perhaps it's time to forget those New Year's Resolutions and spend 2016 doing some soul searching.

Over the years I have done that too.

But at my age, I've decided that basically it is a good year if nothing bad happens. 

So 2015 was a good year and that's my best hope for 2016.  If I am able to make some changes, then that's an added bonus.

And I am sending your way, my best hopes that 2016 will be a good year for you too! 

And don't be too hard on yourself if you have forgotten your New Year's Resolutions by February 1st!  You are not alone!

*Marriage Boot Camp: Reality Stars
**The Bachelor
Television shows listed were for illustrative purposes only and do not necessarily reflect household viewing habits.
(But I think Ben is going to pick Olivia)!

 
 

Thanks for Reading!
 
See you Friday

for my review of the new movie

 
"The Danish Girl"

and 

The Week in Reviews

 
(What to See or Read and What to Avoid)
  
 and the latest on
  
My 1001 Movies I Must See Before

 I Die Project."
 
 
 
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Tuesday, December 31, 2013

A Retired Librarian's New Year's Resolutions



Sigh. 

I can't believe that 2014 is almost here.

So once again it's time to make those New Year's resolutions. 

As you have probably surmised, I like to include my dogs in costumes in my blogs, but I realize that is just a way to get a cheap laugh, so my first resolution is to stop using dogs in costumes as a cheap way of getting a laugh, and instead, I will work to be more serious about the topic at hand.

Ahem.

Every year I make New Year's resolutions, but I usually don't go back and review them.  I think that's a good idea. 


So, in 2013, did I do what I said I was going to do? 

Let's see...

2013 Resolution #1. Lose weight.

No.

2013 Resolution #2. Exercise more.

Nope.

2013 Resolution #3. Pay more attention to my husband.

Oops.

2013 Resolution #4. Watch less TV.

Ouch.

2013 Resolution #5. Stop buying clothes (especially since you will be retiring and won't need so many)
Uh-uh...that's a no for "I can't believe how badly this is going."

2013 Resolution #6. Retire


I did do that.

Maybe that wasn't such a good idea.  But one out of six isn't so bad...
is it?
 
Most of us don't do so well keeping our New Year's resolutions.  Some statistics say we quit during January!
 
However, if you want to make some resolutions you can actually keep, why not try


The Library 


Pick at least three of the following and I promise you, your life will be changed for the better.
 

  • Download free e-books for your Kindle, Nook, IPad or other device from your library's website.

  • Take your child or grandchild to library story times.

  • If you don’t have a library card, get one. It’s free and is your ticket to so much: free DVDs, computer usage, and databases where you can find car repair information, genealogical research, newspapers and much more, all from the convenience of your own home. And you can't find this free on the Internet.  Libraries purchase this information for you.

  • Speaking of DVDs, why pay a service for them when you can check them out for free at the library?  They have the latest releases and you can place your requests online via the web page and check out a bunch at a time.

  • Never got around to learning how to use a computer? Many libraries provide free computer classes and learn how to use a mouse, find what you need on the Internet, use your email effectively, send attachments, copy and paste, all those things that have you stumped. And if you are a job hunter, we have a class highlighting job hunting resources on the Internet, as well as a laptop you can use in the library for as long as you need to.

  • Need help preparing your tax return?  Libraries partner with the AARP every year to help people fill out their tax returns. The service is free by appointment.

  •  New in town and want to meet your fellow residents? The Library is a community gathering place. 

  •  Is your little one just starting to read?  Libraries have books especially focused on new readers. And baby and family story times are designed to help your little one succeed in kindergarten.

  • Have a slow Internet connection or no Internet? Free computer usage is available at the library, and if you have a laptop, most libraries also provide free

 

This is just a taste of what awaits you at the library if you resolve to make your life better this year.
 
So get yourself to the library and start on those resolutions!


Now for those other pesky personal resolutions for 2014...

Sigh.

Let's try one more time...

1. Lose weight.
2. Exercise more
3. Pay more attention to my husband
4. Watch less TV
5. Stop buying clothes



But this year, I am going to take some tips from my friend Juhli over at Boomer Girl's Guide, a blog I highly recommend and add these:


6.  Keep learning
     I am working on my meditation practice and reading, reading, reading

7.  Focus on being happy in the present

      I am keeping a gratitude journal

8.  Give of yourself through volunteering

      I have been appointed to the local Council on Aging - my mother didn't have a
      good "end of life." I am passionate about people being able to end their days in
      their own homes or in the care of their loved ones

9.  Fill my days with meaningful activity

      All of the above and more

10. Laugh

      This is difficult sometimes when one is feeling down, but I do tend to have a
      wry take on things and can still find some humor in despair.



 
What are your New Year's Resolutions? 
(Besides getting yourself to the library, of course).

Best wishes for a happy and productive
New Year!



 
                                           Old habits die hard.



See you Friday for my Oscar Predictions
and the Week in Reviews.

Thanks for reading!
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Friday, December 27, 2013

How Well Do You Know the Classics? A Quiz

One of my New Year's Resolutions is to make my way through the classics of literature, re-reading some, introducing myself to others

So as I make my list, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these you recognize.


See if you can match the picture and quote to the classic book.




1.


"Such helpfulness was found in her - so much power to do and power to sympathize - that many people refused to interpret the scarlet A by its original signification. They said that it meant 'able' so strong was Hester Prynne, with a woman's strength."






2.



"Fiddle-dee-dee. I'll think about that tomorrow."








3. 


"Fifteen men on a dead man's chest. Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum!"







4. 

"If I am the phantom, it is because man's hatred has made me so. If I am to be saved, it is because your love redeems me."








5.


"I told you! No wire hangers, ever!"








6.


"Hardworking folks only smell bad to people who have nothing better than [to} stick their noses in the air. Well, whenever you stick your nose in the air, Nellie Oleson, it's going to get punched!"








7.


"I must be crazy to be in a loony-bin like this."








8. 

Elwood P. Dowd:"I've never heard Harvey say a word against Akron."








9. 

"I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes."







10. 


"Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?"



How did you do?


Here are the answers.

1.  The Scarlet Letter

2.  Gone with the Wind

3.  Treasure Island

4.  Phantom of the Opera

5.  Mommy Dearest

6.  Little House on the Prairie

7.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

8.  Harvey

9.  Great Expectations

10.  Romeo and Juliet


You may disagree with me on what constitutes a classic, but these are definitely "classic" reads, guaranteed to amuse, delight or enlighten.

I plan to read the classics this coming year. 

Why don't you join me?

(All of these titles should be available at your local library).

What recommendations do you have?


 
 
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